Social Science Bites

You might assume that deaths increase in a recession, but that doesn't necessarily happen. What is clear, however, is the relation between government austerity responses to recession and an increase in rates of death. David Stuckler explains in this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: David_Stuckler_on_Austerity_and_Death.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:36am PDT

Social epidemiologist Kate Pickett, co-author (with Richard Wilkinson) of The Spirit Level: why equality is better for everyone, argues that inequality has bad social effects. She discusses her ideas with Nigel Warburton in this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: Kate_Pickett_on_the_Case_for_Equality.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:38pm PDT

Has equality for women been achieved? Feminism has apparently achieved many of its aims. Some of the obvious inequalities between men and women seem to have been removed in recent decades. But have they? Angela McRobbie from the Department of Media and Communications at Goldsmiths, University of London, discusses her research on this topic.

Direct download: Angela_McRobbie_on_the_Illusion_of_Equality_for_Women.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 10:41pm PDT

Lawrence Sherman is a Professor of Criminology at Cambridge University and a keen advocate of experimental criminology. In this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast he outlines his approach and gives some examples of its successes. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: Lawrence_Sherman_on_Criminology.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 1:35am PDT

In this episode of the Social Science Bitespodcast sociologist Ann Oakley discusses her research into a range of questions about women's experience of childbirth based on detailed interviews with 55 women that she conducted in 1975. She has since, with a team of other researchers at the Social Science Research Unit at the Institute of Education, been able to trace some of these women and re-interview them. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: Ann_Oakley_on_Womens_Experience_of_Childbirth.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:42am PDT

New technologies have opened up new possibilities in the area of reproduction. Sarah Franklin, Professor of Sociology at the University of Cambridge discusses this from a sociological perspective in this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: Sarah_Franklin_on_the_Sociology_of_Reproductive_Technologies_1.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 11:45am PDT

Geographer Doreen Massey wants us to rethink our assumptions about space. In this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast she explains why. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: Doreen_Massey_on_Space.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 8:03am PDT

Thinking is hard, and most of the time we rely on simple psychological mechanisms that can lead us astray. In this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast, the Nobel-prizewinning psychologist Daniel Kahneman, author of Thinking, Fast and Slow, talks to Nigel Warburton about biases in our reasoning. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE. Transcripts of all episodes are available from www.socialsciencebites.com 

Direct download: Daniel_Kahneman_on_Bias.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:04am PDT

Cultural Studies sometimes gets a bad press. In this episode of the Social Science Bites podcast Toby Miller, author and editor of over 30 books on interdisciplinary topics within the Social Sciences, discusses Cultural Studies in relation to his work on the Hollywood film industry and addresses wider questions about objectivity and bias. Social Science Bites is made in association with SAGE.

Direct download: Toby_Miller_on_Cultural_Studies.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 7:12am PDT

Is the world getting less violent? It seems unlikely. But Steven Pinker has amassed empirical evidence to show that it is. In this interview with Nigel Warburton for the Social Science Bites podcast he explains some of the possible causes of this transformation. He also discusses some broader questions about the nature of the social sciences.

Direct download: Steven_Pinker_on_Violence_and_Human_Nature.mp3
Category:general -- posted at: 3:05am PDT